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EP 19: Treating Physical & Emotional Pain After Multiple Catastrophic Events

Trying to overcome one catastrophic event is difficult enough but our guest today has overcome adversity several times in their life. We first met Linda a few years ago after she was in a terrible car accident that rolled her vehicle over several times. That life-changing event came about 20 years after she was on site at Ground Zero when planes struck the World Trade Center in New York City.

She’s an incredibly tough and resilient woman and someone we think can help you out if you’re facing a catastrophic event. In part one of our discussion, Linda takes us back to that dark day on 9/11 and the mental health struggles she’s dealt with since being trampled that day. Then we’ll talk about the car accident she experienced that led to us eventually meeting her. The physical injuries she suffered weren’t immediately discovered and we’ll talk about why it’s so important to get treatment right away.

Here’s some of what we discuss in this episode:
0:00 – Intro
0:59 – How we met Linda
1:29 – Her 9/11 experience
4:52 – Trauma from 9/11
6:56 – Car accident in 2021
9:40 – Discovering the injuries later
16:11 – Recovery process

Featured Keyword & Other Tags

Car accident, trauma, mental health, physical injuries, 9/11

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Welcome to the catastrophic comeback podcast with American Injury Lawyer Clark speaks, helping you find hope, purpose and joy after a catastrophic injury.

Hi, and welcome to catastrophic comeback today I'm really happy to have my guest, Linda, Sabir ski. Linda is great to see you. Thank you for being here. Thank you for having me. So, Linda, you are a person who's overcome adversity several times in your life. Yes. And that's kind of the purpose of this podcast, like we want to, we want to find people who have been through some kind of terrible tragedy, and we want to, we want to go in and give them examples and, and describe our experiences in the hopes that they might, they might, it might help somebody. Yes. And you're going to be a great guest for that for exactly that reason. So before we get in, to Well, tell me just briefly, how is it that you became a client of ours? Well,

I had a car accident about two years ago. Okay. And so your commercials on TV? said we'll try you in great.

Okay. And it wasn't just a fender bender. It was an

accident, two shoulder surgeries on my shoulders. Yes.

Okay. Before we get into that, I want to back up a little bit. Because I know that this is not the first time that you've had to deal with adversity. In fact, you were you were present in New York City? Not 11. Yes, sir. Right. Can you tell me a little bit about that experience? What? What do you remember of that day?

I remember quite a lot. I do remember. A plane, the first plane hit one of the towers. And we were asked to exit the building, walking down the stairs, and we were actually facing the back. And then like maybe 10 minutes later, I saw a second plane which was a little lower. So

by now you're out of the Yes. What? What's going on? What floor are you on? When you're told to evacuate the building? Well, we were I was on the 19th floor. Okay, and they're telling you to go down the stairs? Because the elevator No,

they closed the elevators down. We

walked down the stairs, what's going through your mind when you're going down the stairs? I

know what it was didn't know. I just thought of just you know, accidents happen. I just thought it was a plane that hit the building. Why? Or how I had no idea why

but you had already heard that it was a plane it had to be Did you think it was a big commercial plane or a little kind of a, you know, a small plane or Wi

Fi? We just thought it was maybe like one of those people with a cold out single engine plane just under Yeah. So you know, maybe it was an accident, maybe you know, somebody had a heart attack. And you know, they couldn't fly anymore. It did not. It didn't even cross my mind that the first time I thought, Wow, that's a bad accident.

So when you're coming down from the 19th floor after the first plane hit in your mind, it's no big deal. You didn't think it was you know? Okay. And then what happened was

I said, when we came out of the building we were, we were in the back. So I didn't see anything more in the front. So now I see the second plane coming was to the right of us. And I just thought maybe it was like a water plane, you know, going to put out the fire and stuff. But no, that plane crashed into the tower. And me and everyone else that was behind it. Behind the building, we all turned to run to get away. And in the process of me running, I was knocked over and tripled on. And then we made our way over the Brooklyn Bridge over the bridge, everybody's screaming and running. And then I turned around and I saw one of the towers go down and it was just like an accordion with just black smoke. So when that happened, everybody I turned around and looked like cattle was like, Tracy me. So I just move over to the side of the bridge. So I wouldn't get you know, trampled on again. And it was like a woman she said I couldn't help anybody think of anyone I just wanted to get home, walked across the bridge. We were getting cars, you know, stopping cars to give us a ride home and stuff. And and then for a long time I was paranoid. Any car that had like a backfire, you know, and even now today, wherever I'm go, I'm very cautious of where I'm going. Sure. Yeah, I

always looking for things that might be out of place. Right.

And also, I don't know if anyone but your instincts if you feel tingling or something's not right, listen to it, because that day, I felt something was not right. And I was correct. Wow. And so

as a result of that experience, you had some physical and some mental

health, mental issues. Okay, I, as I said, I would not put myself in a crowd of people. Like if there's a parade going on, I'm at the stage in the back. I just won't put myself in, you know, people. I don't know if people think this is weird, or I'm not, I'm not, I'm just very cautious because I had that travel, a traumatic experience. And I feel very helpless and vulnerable. And I don't ever want to be in that situation again. So I'm very cautious.

So So I mean, a lot of it like I saw it on TV. It's not the same. And so swag. That's what that's kind of my point is it's not the same. And even then, like, years later, if I see a plane that's flying unusually low in a city, or even even in, you know, Charlotte, or Wilmington, or whatever, and I see a plane that's flying unusually low immediately. It's like, hey, wait a minute, something's going on here. So I can imagine how much worse the

plane is, like I told you the movie like The Towering Inferno. And that was just a movie. But that's exactly I mean, I saw a man and a woman holding hands. And they landed on the roof of the Marriott Hotel, and I was like, I was more in shock. I was like, Oh, this is not a movie. This is real. Yeah, that's true. Yeah, it's, I would hope I've never experienced anything like this in my life again, it's just, it's gonna stay. I can be 90 years old. I probably still remember it. Sure. Yeah. Okay,

so you have some experience with with adversity and with overcoming adversity and that sort of thing. And you knew some of the people that were in that really? Yeah. Right. And yes, in fact, you worked in that building? years before? Yeah, right.

When I first started in 1980, I was on the 100 and second floor, and I was a little nervous, but because the building sway, they said it has to sway, so doesn't fall. But then the first 9092 They try, but they tried underneath. So that one but this? No. I mean, they really got us. I think they caught us on guard, you know? Yeah. The city. Yeah. Okay,

so let's go forward then to October of 2021. Right. And this is when your accident? Yes. When I have been with Carolina. Can you tell us tell us what happened in the accident? Okay,

well, Jay and I, he would drive to the airport, I would drive back, I'm coming. And whereby we're a little river. And on the right of it is a plantation and I saw, you know, my, there's a car waiting to pass. So it's an intersection. It's a traffic light. Yeah, it's actually you can go out and want just a space and to turn and go around. So the light changes. Now he I guess the guy that hit me wasn't paying attention. So I'm moving, he thought he could probably go through. So wherever he hit me in the back, and as I said, my car rolls over three times. So the impact must have been really, for him to make my car roll over three times. I mean, I had an equinox that's an SUV. So so

you're running on the road, minding your own business. And as I'm getting ready to go with the light, he and somebody comes out of nowhere, slams you in the back, and it causes your SUV to roll over three times. Yes. Yes. Okay. And then. So what happened after that? After that the

the ambulance came and the fire department. There was a woman who said she was a nurse that she would help me out of the car. I said, No, no one's helping me out of the car. I mean, I didn't lose consciousness or anything. But I did have like from the seatbelt, you need to wear your seatbelt. But from the seatbelt. I had a big like a welt around my neck. I was basically all bruised, my whole body was bruised. They took me to the emergency room, and you know, everything was fine, but I was just basically bruised. And based on what I had from 911 This added to it, so I'm just leery of anything. That's not right. It's just you know, and I anytime I and as I said it took me 20 years, no exaggeration to actually see the 911 program that they had there. If Tommy comes on, Mike, where we live in Brazil plantation every year they called it they read the names. They did it like three years for the first time. I was even surprised that I did. I read the names. And I've done it like the last two years in a row just to you know, honor the people that passed and stuff like that. Sure.

Sure. Yeah. Well, I can definitely understand that. That was a mean, I think that was a you know, one of the most significant and I

said I just thought it was just you know, just a normal you know that accidents happen? Sure. Yes. Second plane. It was I thought maybe it was I have no I was just like, Yeah,

okay, so. So I understand. Okay, so after the accident that took place in the traffic acts, and that took place in October of 2021. Did you know immediately that you were that you had some serious injuries. Okay, in fact, they sit there the ER said hey, you're just bruised and you're gonna be okay. And then And then what happened after that, after

I had started? I mean, my body was really hurting me. Psychologically, it was like I was playing over my mind, and it was like, an accident should not have happened. Then I started thinking about 911. Again, you know, and then I actually said it's 21 years, one month, and three days from the accident, and that just popped into my head just unexpectedly. So I said to him, and as a tragedy, I'm gonna be my 80s. Just Just take me I mean, it's just I can't, I can't. Okay,

so at some point, you realize, so this is, at some point, you realize that you're, you do have some some more serious injuries than you anticipate? Is that correct? Yeah. What were those injuries? Well, as

I said, my, my arms, I had to actually get surgery on this shoulder. And then I had to get surgery on the shoulder. And then I had to like six months apart. So yeah, so I'm wondering, they have to repair the rotator cuff they had to remove I think. So now I'm going to this gym, which now I have the back. I mean, I couldn't even touch like this in the back, like at least do this. And I've been going to him three months, three months. So I keep doing that. And hopefully I could get to be my normal self again.

So the interesting thing about that, I think, is that when you were at the emergency room, they do what emergency rooms do, right? They they figure out your it doesn't look like you're gonna die, you don't have any broken, any head injuries. So they don't know anything more than that about the seriousness of your injuries.

And then also not only the injuries, but then you have mental stuff going on in your head. So

sure, yeah. And then but you did something that's important, then you got treatment, and then you got follow up treatments, and then you and then during that follow up, when did you discover and how did you discover that these, these injuries to your shoulders, the pain. So you figured you figured initially, it'll get better over time, I got hit really hard. It'll subside in a couple of weeks or months. And

after six months, because you can't do that close together. So six months, I had this one. And then if the other six months, I had this one. So

this is something that we see a lot of times seems like, you know, a lot of our clients, they work hard. They've, they've raised families, they care take care of their families. And if they get involved in an accident, they're very quick to if they get a clean bill of health from the ER or if they don't, you know, if nothing's visibly broken, then they're like, Okay, I'll get back to work and do because he gets because you got rent, you got house payment, you got to take care of your family.

The Bender, yes. But

But let me ask you this. Instead of sit, so then what happens a lot of times is people say, well, it'll probably get better, it'll probably get better, you know, I went to the ER, they checked me out, I don't have anything broken, it'll probably get better. So they don't have any follow up treatment. And then six months later, they still have the same problem that hasn't gotten any better. In fact, it's gotten worse. And then they want to come to come to call us. And at that point, there's a problem because you have what's called a gap in treatment. Right? And when you have a gap and treatment, insurance companies can use that as a basis to deny a claim to not pay claims.

To be honest, I don't know. I don't know if the no full paid off my insurance paid I well, I know that the bill was paid, and I had, you know, a minimum co payment. I'm thinking it was under no fault, because when I worked I worked with insurance, I believe was probably on the no fault, but I'm not 100%. Sure. Well, so

what I'm telling you what I'm, what I'm saying to you is that is that in North Carolina, what will happen in these situations is a lot of people will say to themselves, it'll probably get better, so I don't need to get medical treatment. But then fortunately for you, you did go to the doctor, you did get follow up treatment, they were able to identify how do they identify these injuries? X rays,

I believe? Well, there's a specialist that does the what was the MRI? Yeah, but he was actually one that checked me out when I did the surgeries. But yeah, they did an MRI, I believe it

was. So an MRI is different from an x ray because you can see soft tissue damage, right? And that's where the rotator cuff injuries would have been apparent. And he

actually showed it to me after he got the X ray, you know where the injury is and stuff like that. And then six months later, as I said, I had to do the right show.

So what advice would you give to somebody who is who has has been in an accident, and they they're hurting, but they don't have any broken bones. And they don't have any active life threatening injuries, visible

injuries. They should because in a month to three months from now, it could get serious because it went went untreated. And they may not even think it's from the axis They had. So mine just happened to be because I was basically all bruised. And that's what basically what they looked on it and I noticed like a couple days later I was like something's not right. So I went to the doctor and he's like, No, you need another surgery. And I said it's from the accident.

So it's important to get that follow up treatment and to make sure that somebody looks if you're having, if you have if you know that something's not right is to is to is to continue to have follow up

training, if I didn't, if that's all I had, but then again, it could have been three months later, then I could say, well, three months ago, I was in a serious car accident. So maybe that's what it is. But no any problem

is, is when you wait like that, then that gives you you have a legal obligation to mitigate your damages. So when people when people don't get that follow up treatment, they gotta

be alright. I'm sure it'll be alright. As you could know, it could fester in a couple of months. Yeah,

yeah, that's, that's a problem. So we encourage people to to get the treatment that they don't

know what if nothing happens, that's fine. But if you don't report it, and you know, have it on, and file that they can say, how do we know that's from the accident? Right,

exactly. Let me ask you this. What because because it could have been anything you could see, you know, you could have fallen in the shower, or you could have, you know, it could have been anything, so, excuse me. Okay, so the surgery what, what was what was that like? And what was the recovery process? Like, oh,

my god, the recovery process was like six weeks. I had to sleep in the recliner for six weeks, you know, you know, labor, I couldn't lay straight down. And it was and it was very especially taking a shower. I had the and I could take off the brace and but it was just very difficult. Even going to the restroom was very, very difficult to go.

We had to do one shoulder at a time, right? Yes. That

I won't do anything. Yeah. Now, this was the left was done. And then six months later, because they said what the anesthesia, you can't have too much of something. But they wanted this to heal. As I said, it's gotten better, but it's never going to be 100%. Right? Yeah. Yeah.

Okay, so and then in the recovery process was that did that how long did that take? It was a painful? Yeah. Are you glad you did it? Are you better now than you would have

said I did the surgery. That's what Yes. Well, the recovery, I would say, it's still going on, but it's not. It's I would say hard recovery as far as really to get. I was depressed too, because I really couldn't do the things that I used to do. But it was harder, you know, the recovery, but now I could do more. But I can't do as a lot as I want to do. But I mean, I could have told you back in my hands. I could do this. But it's a slow process, but it's getting there.

Thank you for joining us, and we'll see you next time.

Transcript

Welcome to the catastrophic comeback podcast with American Injury Lawyer Clark speaks, helping you find hope, purpose and joy after a catastrophic injury.

Hi, and welcome to catastrophic comeback today I'm really happy to have my guest, Linda, Sabir ski. Linda is great to see you. Thank you for being here. Thank you for having me. So, Linda, you are a person who's overcome adversity several times in your life. Yes. And that's kind of the purpose of this podcast, like we want to, we want to find people who have been through some kind of terrible tragedy, and we want to, we want to go in and give them examples and, and describe our experiences in the hopes that they might, they might, it might help somebody. Yes. And you're going to be a great guest for that for exactly that reason. So before we get in, to Well, tell me just briefly, how is it that you became a client of ours? Well,

I had a car accident about two years ago. Okay. And so your commercials on TV? said we'll try you in great.

Okay. And it wasn't just a fender bender. It was an

accident, two shoulder surgeries on my shoulders. Yes.

Okay. Before we get into that, I want to back up a little bit. Because I know that this is not the first time that you've had to deal with adversity. In fact, you were you were present in New York City? Not 11. Yes, sir. Right. Can you tell me a little bit about that experience? What? What do you remember of that day?

I remember quite a lot. I do remember. A plane, the first plane hit one of the towers. And we were asked to exit the building, walking down the stairs, and we were actually facing the back. And then like maybe 10 minutes later, I saw a second plane which was a little lower. So

by now you're out of the Yes. What? What's going on? What floor are you on? When you're told to evacuate the building? Well, we were I was on the 19th floor. Okay, and they're telling you to go down the stairs? Because the elevator No,

they closed the elevators down. We

walked down the stairs, what's going through your mind when you're going down the stairs? I

know what it was didn't know. I just thought of just you know, accidents happen. I just thought it was a plane that hit the building. Why? Or how I had no idea why

but you had already heard that it was a plane it had to be Did you think it was a big commercial plane or a little kind of a, you know, a small plane or Wi

Fi? We just thought it was maybe like one of those people with a cold out single engine plane just under Yeah. So you know, maybe it was an accident, maybe you know, somebody had a heart attack. And you know, they couldn't fly anymore. It did not. It didn't even cross my mind that the first time I thought, Wow, that's a bad accident.

So when you're coming down from the 19th floor after the first plane hit in your mind, it's no big deal. You didn't think it was you know? Okay. And then what happened was

I said, when we came out of the building we were, we were in the back. So I didn't see anything more in the front. So now I see the second plane coming was to the right of us. And I just thought maybe it was like a water plane, you know, going to put out the fire and stuff. But no, that plane crashed into the tower. And me and everyone else that was behind it. Behind the building, we all turned to run to get away. And in the process of me running, I was knocked over and tripled on. And then we made our way over the Brooklyn Bridge over the bridge, everybody's screaming and running. And then I turned around and I saw one of the towers go down and it was just like an accordion with just black smoke. So when that happened, everybody I turned around and looked like cattle was like, Tracy me. So I just move over to the side of the bridge. So I wouldn't get you know, trampled on again. And it was like a woman she said I couldn't help anybody think of anyone I just wanted to get home, walked across the bridge. We were getting cars, you know, stopping cars to give us a ride home and stuff. And and then for a long time I was paranoid. Any car that had like a backfire, you know, and even now today, wherever I'm go, I'm very cautious of where I'm going. Sure. Yeah, I

always looking for things that might be out of place. Right.

And also, I don't know if anyone but your instincts if you feel tingling or something's not right, listen to it, because that day, I felt something was not right. And I was correct. Wow. And so

as a result of that experience, you had some physical and some mental

health, mental issues. Okay, I, as I said, I would not put myself in a crowd of people. Like if there's a parade going on, I'm at the stage in the back. I just won't put myself in, you know, people. I don't know if people think this is weird, or I'm not, I'm not, I'm just very cautious because I had that travel, a traumatic experience. And I feel very helpless and vulnerable. And I don't ever want to be in that situation again. So I'm very cautious.

So So I mean, a lot of it like I saw it on TV. It's not the same. And so swag. That's what that's kind of my point is it's not the same. And even then, like, years later, if I see a plane that's flying unusually low in a city, or even even in, you know, Charlotte, or Wilmington, or whatever, and I see a plane that's flying unusually low immediately. It's like, hey, wait a minute, something's going on here. So I can imagine how much worse the

plane is, like I told you the movie like The Towering Inferno. And that was just a movie. But that's exactly I mean, I saw a man and a woman holding hands. And they landed on the roof of the Marriott Hotel, and I was like, I was more in shock. I was like, Oh, this is not a movie. This is real. Yeah, that's true. Yeah, it's, I would hope I've never experienced anything like this in my life again, it's just, it's gonna stay. I can be 90 years old. I probably still remember it. Sure. Yeah. Okay,

so you have some experience with with adversity and with overcoming adversity and that sort of thing. And you knew some of the people that were in that really? Yeah. Right. And yes, in fact, you worked in that building? years before? Yeah, right.

When I first started in 1980, I was on the 100 and second floor, and I was a little nervous, but because the building sway, they said it has to sway, so doesn't fall. But then the first 9092 They try, but they tried underneath. So that one but this? No. I mean, they really got us. I think they caught us on guard, you know? Yeah. The city. Yeah. Okay,

so let's go forward then to October of 2021. Right. And this is when your accident? Yes. When I have been with Carolina. Can you tell us tell us what happened in the accident? Okay,

well, Jay and I, he would drive to the airport, I would drive back, I'm coming. And whereby we're a little river. And on the right of it is a plantation and I saw, you know, my, there's a car waiting to pass. So it's an intersection. It's a traffic light. Yeah, it's actually you can go out and want just a space and to turn and go around. So the light changes. Now he I guess the guy that hit me wasn't paying attention. So I'm moving, he thought he could probably go through. So wherever he hit me in the back, and as I said, my car rolls over three times. So the impact must have been really, for him to make my car roll over three times. I mean, I had an equinox that's an SUV. So so

you're running on the road, minding your own business. And as I'm getting ready to go with the light, he and somebody comes out of nowhere, slams you in the back, and it causes your SUV to roll over three times. Yes. Yes. Okay. And then. So what happened after that? After that the

the ambulance came and the fire department. There was a woman who said she was a nurse that she would help me out of the car. I said, No, no one's helping me out of the car. I mean, I didn't lose consciousness or anything. But I did have like from the seatbelt, you need to wear your seatbelt. But from the seatbelt. I had a big like a welt around my neck. I was basically all bruised, my whole body was bruised. They took me to the emergency room, and you know, everything was fine, but I was just basically bruised. And based on what I had from 911 This added to it, so I'm just leery of anything. That's not right. It's just you know, and I anytime I and as I said it took me 20 years, no exaggeration to actually see the 911 program that they had there. If Tommy comes on, Mike, where we live in Brazil plantation every year they called it they read the names. They did it like three years for the first time. I was even surprised that I did. I read the names. And I've done it like the last two years in a row just to you know, honor the people that passed and stuff like that. Sure.

Sure. Yeah. Well, I can definitely understand that. That was a mean, I think that was a you know, one of the most significant and I

said I just thought it was just you know, just a normal you know that accidents happen? Sure. Yes. Second plane. It was I thought maybe it was I have no I was just like, Yeah,

okay, so. So I understand. Okay, so after the accident that took place in the traffic acts, and that took place in October of 2021. Did you know immediately that you were that you had some serious injuries. Okay, in fact, they sit there the ER said hey, you're just bruised and you're gonna be okay. And then And then what happened after that, after

I had started? I mean, my body was really hurting me. Psychologically, it was like I was playing over my mind, and it was like, an accident should not have happened. Then I started thinking about 911. Again, you know, and then I actually said it's 21 years, one month, and three days from the accident, and that just popped into my head just unexpectedly. So I said to him, and as a tragedy, I'm gonna be my 80s. Just Just take me I mean, it's just I can't, I can't. Okay,

so at some point, you realize, so this is, at some point, you realize that you're, you do have some some more serious injuries than you anticipate? Is that correct? Yeah. What were those injuries? Well, as

I said, my, my arms, I had to actually get surgery on this shoulder. And then I had to get surgery on the shoulder. And then I had to like six months apart. So yeah, so I'm wondering, they have to repair the rotator cuff they had to remove I think. So now I'm going to this gym, which now I have the back. I mean, I couldn't even touch like this in the back, like at least do this. And I've been going to him three months, three months. So I keep doing that. And hopefully I could get to be my normal self again.

So the interesting thing about that, I think, is that when you were at the emergency room, they do what emergency rooms do, right? They they figure out your it doesn't look like you're gonna die, you don't have any broken, any head injuries. So they don't know anything more than that about the seriousness of your injuries.

And then also not only the injuries, but then you have mental stuff going on in your head. So

sure, yeah. And then but you did something that's important, then you got treatment, and then you got follow up treatments, and then you and then during that follow up, when did you discover and how did you discover that these, these injuries to your shoulders, the pain. So you figured you figured initially, it'll get better over time, I got hit really hard. It'll subside in a couple of weeks or months. And

after six months, because you can't do that close together. So six months, I had this one. And then if the other six months, I had this one. So

this is something that we see a lot of times seems like, you know, a lot of our clients, they work hard. They've, they've raised families, they care take care of their families. And if they get involved in an accident, they're very quick to if they get a clean bill of health from the ER or if they don't, you know, if nothing's visibly broken, then they're like, Okay, I'll get back to work and do because he gets because you got rent, you got house payment, you got to take care of your family.

The Bender, yes. But

But let me ask you this. Instead of sit, so then what happens a lot of times is people say, well, it'll probably get better, it'll probably get better, you know, I went to the ER, they checked me out, I don't have anything broken, it'll probably get better. So they don't have any follow up treatment. And then six months later, they still have the same problem that hasn't gotten any better. In fact, it's gotten worse. And then they want to come to come to call us. And at that point, there's a problem because you have what's called a gap in treatment. Right? And when you have a gap and treatment, insurance companies can use that as a basis to deny a claim to not pay claims.

To be honest, I don't know. I don't know if the no full paid off my insurance paid I well, I know that the bill was paid, and I had, you know, a minimum co payment. I'm thinking it was under no fault, because when I worked I worked with insurance, I believe was probably on the no fault, but I'm not 100%. Sure. Well, so

what I'm telling you what I'm, what I'm saying to you is that is that in North Carolina, what will happen in these situations is a lot of people will say to themselves, it'll probably get better, so I don't need to get medical treatment. But then fortunately for you, you did go to the doctor, you did get follow up treatment, they were able to identify how do they identify these injuries? X rays,

I believe? Well, there's a specialist that does the what was the MRI? Yeah, but he was actually one that checked me out when I did the surgeries. But yeah, they did an MRI, I believe it

was. So an MRI is different from an x ray because you can see soft tissue damage, right? And that's where the rotator cuff injuries would have been apparent. And he

actually showed it to me after he got the X ray, you know where the injury is and stuff like that. And then six months later, as I said, I had to do the right show.

So what advice would you give to somebody who is who has has been in an accident, and they they're hurting, but they don't have any broken bones. And they don't have any active life threatening injuries, visible

injuries. They should because in a month to three months from now, it could get serious because it went went untreated. And they may not even think it's from the axis They had. So mine just happened to be because I was basically all bruised. And that's what basically what they looked on it and I noticed like a couple days later I was like something's not right. So I went to the doctor and he's like, No, you need another surgery. And I said it's from the accident.

So it's important to get that follow up treatment and to make sure that somebody looks if you're having, if you have if you know that something's not right is to is to is to continue to have follow up

training, if I didn't, if that's all I had, but then again, it could have been three months later, then I could say, well, three months ago, I was in a serious car accident. So maybe that's what it is. But no any problem

is, is when you wait like that, then that gives you you have a legal obligation to mitigate your damages. So when people when people don't get that follow up treatment, they gotta

be alright. I'm sure it'll be alright. As you could know, it could fester in a couple of months. Yeah,

yeah, that's, that's a problem. So we encourage people to to get the treatment that they don't

know what if nothing happens, that's fine. But if you don't report it, and you know, have it on, and file that they can say, how do we know that's from the accident? Right,

exactly. Let me ask you this. What because because it could have been anything you could see, you know, you could have fallen in the shower, or you could have, you know, it could have been anything, so, excuse me. Okay, so the surgery what, what was what was that like? And what was the recovery process? Like, oh,

my god, the recovery process was like six weeks. I had to sleep in the recliner for six weeks, you know, you know, labor, I couldn't lay straight down. And it was and it was very especially taking a shower. I had the and I could take off the brace and but it was just very difficult. Even going to the restroom was very, very difficult to go.

We had to do one shoulder at a time, right? Yes. That

I won't do anything. Yeah. Now, this was the left was done. And then six months later, because they said what the anesthesia, you can't have too much of something. But they wanted this to heal. As I said, it's gotten better, but it's never going to be 100%. Right? Yeah. Yeah.

Okay, so and then in the recovery process was that did that how long did that take? It was a painful? Yeah. Are you glad you did it? Are you better now than you would have

said I did the surgery. That's what Yes. Well, the recovery, I would say, it's still going on, but it's not. It's I would say hard recovery as far as really to get. I was depressed too, because I really couldn't do the things that I used to do. But it was harder, you know, the recovery, but now I could do more. But I can't do as a lot as I want to do. But I mean, I could have told you back in my hands. I could do this. But it's a slow process, but it's getting there.

Thank you for joining us, and we'll see you next time.

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